Lebanese Garlic Chicken Thighs and Warm Spinach Salad

img_2619by Karen Frazier

I’m on day 22 of my Whole30 30-day challenge, and I’ve been tinkering in the kitchen. Yesterday, I decided to make Lebanese garlic sauce. Today, I decided to spread it on chicken thighs. The result? Delicious!

The recipe is Whole30 approved when you use sugar-free bacon (I like it from US Wellness Meats), as well as paleo and low-carb.

Lebanese Garlic Sauce

Makes about 2 1/2 cups

  • 1/2 cup peeled garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 cups EVOO
  • Juice of 3 lemons
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  1. In a food processor or blender, combine the garlic cloves and sea salt. Blend, scraping down the sides occasionally, until the garlic cloves make a fine paste.
  2. Add the EVOO in a very thin stream with the food processor still running until it is completely incorporated. This step will take about 10 minutes.
  3. Add the lemon juice and pepper. Blend briefly to mix.

This has pretty good kick, but you can taste and adjust by adding more olive oil or lemon juice to suit your own taste buds, which is what I do. Even after I’ve added the lemon juice, I add extra olive oil, just making sure it goes in a thin stream. This will store in your fridge, tightly sealed, for a few weeks. If you prefer a more neutrally flavored oil, you can use another expeller pressed oil, such as avocado oil, or use half avocado oil and half EVOO. I like the California Olive Ranch everyday EVOO, which has a mild flavor.

Lebanese Garlic Chicken Thighs

Serves 4

  • 8 whole chicken thighs
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 tablespoons Lebanese garlic sauce
  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Place the chicken thighs, skin side up, in a large baking or roasting pan and sprinkle them with the sea salt and black pepper.
  3. Spread each with one tablespoon (or more) of the Lebanese garlic sauce.
  4. Bake in the preheated oven for 70 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through.

I like to make enough for two meals – my motto is cook once and eat twice. It’s a great time saver.

Warm Spinach Salad

Serves 4

  • 6 slices sugar-free bacon, chopped
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar, red wine vinegar, or champagne vinegar
  • 10 ounces baby spinach
  1. In a medium saute pan on medium-high heat, brown the bacon until all the fat is rendered. Remove the bacon from the fat in the pan with a slotted spoon and set it aside.
  2. Add the shallot to the fat in the pan along with the salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, for one minute.
  3. Add the orange juice and vinegar. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the liquid is reduced by half, three or four minutes.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the spinach and the bacon. Toss with the warm vinaigrette and serve immediately.

 

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Low-Carb, Paleo Hummus

img_2608by Karen Frazier

I love hummus and when I went paleo, it was one of the most difficult things to give up. Fortunately, I came up with a fabulous replacement that tastes just like the real stuff, but is paleo friendly, low-carb, and Whole30 compliant when you serve it with chopped veggies.

  • 1 medium zucchini, roughly chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves (or to taste)
  • 3 tablespoons Italian parsley
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon tahini

Combine all ingredients in a food processor and pulse until smooth. Drizzle with EVOO.

 

Crispy Pork Belly and Shiitake Mushrooms on Asian Slaw

IMG_2559.JPGby Karen Frazier

For the new year, I’ve embarked on a Whole30 30-day re-set through my Nia/yoga studio. Although I tend to eat fairly cleanly or suffer the consequences, my habits towards the end of the year slipped a bit, so a Whole30 clean eating re-set is the perfect way to banish some inflammation I know built up over the holidays. For today’s recipe, I use pork belly that I get from Tenderbelly. It’s as delicious as it sounds.

Crispy Pork Belly and Shiitake Mushrooms on Asian Slaw

For the pork and mushrooms

  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound pork belly, thinly sliced (about like thick cut bacon-width) and then cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 2 tablespoons duck fat (or lard or another Whole30 friendly fat)
  • 8 ounces shiitake mushrooms, quartered

For the slaw

  • 6 cups of shredded cabbage
  • 2 carrots, peeled and grated
  • 1 bunch green onions, sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated ginger
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar
  • Juice of one orange
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds

For the pork belly:

  1. In a small bowl, mix the sea salt, garlic powder, onion powder, smoked paprika, and black pepper. Sprinkle the mixture evenly over the pork belly.
  2. In a large skillet (I use a 12-inch cast iron skillet), heat the duck fat on medium-high until it shimmers.
  3. Add the pork belly and mushrooms. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the pork belly is crisp, about eight minutes.

For the slaw:

  1. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, carrots, and green onions.
  2. In a small glass measuring cup, whisk together the garlic, ginger, cilantro, sea salt, pepper, apple cider vinegar, orange, and olive oil until combined. Toss with the slaw.
  3. To assemble, spoon the dressed slaw onto a plate or into a bowl. Top with the shiitake and pork belly. Garnish with sesame seeds and sliced green onions, if desired.

8 Pasta Hacks for the Paleo or Low-Carb Foodie

zucchini-lasagna

You don’t have to limit yourself to zucchini lasagna.  Photo credit sexyliciousness via photopin.

by Karen Frazier

When I tell people I have celiac disease and can’t eat gluten, and that I further choose to eat low-carb paleo to help health conditions and keep my weight in check, one of the most common reactions I get is this one: “I could NEVER give up pasta!”

I get it – I truly do. Back in the day, I loved pasta. It was cheap, versatile, delicious, and easy way to get totally creative in the kitchen. Sadly, I love pasta, but it doesn’t love me even a little bit.

Since I eat mostly low-carb paleo, pasta is a thing of the past for me. I can’t eat gluten-free pasta substitutes (often made from corn flour, rice flour, or a combination of various legume-based flours). But I still enjoy a tasty pasta-style dish from time to time, such as my low-carb paleo lemon and artichoke shrimp scampi on zoodles.

With years of low-carb and paleo experience under my belt in a household of picky eaters, here are some of my best low-carb and/or paleo pasta hacks.

paderno1. Spiralize “Zoodles” and Other Veggie Noodles.

If you’re not new to the paleo world, chances are you’ve made a batch of zoodles – or another kind of veggie noodles – in your day. In fact, I’ve written an entire cookbook about making noodles out of veggies using a handy little gadget called a spiralizer. I use the Paderno World Spiralizer, and all you’ve got to do is crank the handle to get super cool “noodles” that make a great stand-in for pasta if you’ve either chosen or been forced into a gluten-free lifestyle. Try it, you’ll like it.

2. Make Veggie Peeler Noodles.

julienne-peeler

Dual veggie and julienne peeler from Precision Kitchenware

Limited shelf-space or no room in the budget for yet another gadget – or both? No worries. If you’ve got a veggie peeler and a knife, then dang it, you’ve got oodles of zoodles and other veggie noodles. It’s pretty easy. Use a veggie peeler to cut the vegtables into ribbons. Then, either leave wide ribbon style veggie pasta, or use a paring knife to cut the noodles into smaller shapes.

You can also try a julienne peeler, which will cut the veggies into angel-hair like strips. No need to clutter your drawers with both, however. Many manufacturers make peelers that do double duty, working as both a veggie and julienne peeler. Clever!

3. Choose Veggies That Noodle.

That’s right. Noodle is a verb. Of course, not all veggies are created equal when it comes to noodling around. Some veggies make much better noodles than others. Try noodling:

  • Zucchini and other summer squash (peeled or unpeeled)
  • Sweet potato
  • Winter squash
  • Carrots
  • Parsnips
  • Beets
  • Other solid root veggies

To cook the veggie noodles, I recommend sautéing them in your fat of choice, sprinkled with a little salt, for two to five minutes, until they are al dente.

spaghetti-squash4. Use The Aptly Named Spaghetti Squash.

So what if you abhor kitchen gadgets of all kinds (I can’t imagine anyone not loving a kitchen gadget, but that’s just me, owner of a Ginsu knife that supposedly can hack through an aluminum can in one clean slice), so making fancy noodles is out? If you have an oven, a baking sheet, a fork, and a sharp knife, you can still make veggie noodles from spaghetti squash.

  1. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Cut the squash in half lengthwise.
  3. Place it cut-side down on a baking sheet and bake it in the preheated oven until it is tender, 30 to 45 minutes.
  4. Remove it from the oven. Use a fork to pull the flesh away from the rind in “noodles” and go forth with whatever sauce sounds tasty to you.

5. But What About Lasagna and Stuffed Pasta Dishes?

salamiI’m so glad you asked. Of course, you can use thinly sliced eggplant or zucchini as your lasagna noodles or as a pasta to wrap around filling. Here are some tips:

  • Use a mandoline for paper-thin slices.
  • I recommend if you do this, you place the thin slices of veggies in a colander in the sink and salt them. Then, after about 30 minutes, wipe away the salt completely and use the veggies. The salt will draw off excess water so you won’t wind up with a watery dish. Go forth and make your lasagna or stuffed pasta.

6. But What if I Can’t Stomach Another Noodle Made From Veggies?

Here’s the thing. It’s okay to be super sick of veggie noodles and you want something a little different. In this case, I offer a tried and true idea from the Frazier household to yours that will change the way you make low-carb lasagna. Use thin slices of salami as your noodles. I’ll allow a moment for the genius of this idea to sink in before I continue. Salame. Thinly sliced (or another deli-sliced meat you like). Use it as your noodle layers or wrap it around a filling. Of course, you could also use large pieces of kale or spinach, but doesn’t using pre-sliced salami, crisp cooked slices of bacon or pancetta, or some lovely Canadian bacon sound somehow much tastier?

This is one of my favorite low-carb maxims – when in doubt, wrap it in meat, baby! You’re welcome!

7. Whip Up a Truly Great Tomato Sauce.

A good tomato sauce is shockingly easy. It takes a bit of time, of course, but most of that is time you can spend reading a book as the sauce simmers to allow the flavors to blend. Here’s my super easy and tasty tomato sauce.

  • 2 tablespoons fat of your choice
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano (or Italian seasoning blend)
  • 2 (15-ounce) cans crushed organic tomatoes (I love Muir Glen, which has no sugar added), drained
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • Pinch red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 cup chopped, fresh basil
  1. In a large saucepan, heat the fat on medium-high until it shimmers.
  2. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions begin to brown, about five minutes.
  3. Add the garlic and oregano and cook, stirring constantly, until it is fragrant, about 30 seconds.
  4. Add the tomatoes, salt, and red pepper flakes. Simmer on low, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is the desired consistency and the flavors are blended, 30 to 45 minutes.
  5. Stir in the basil.

8. Make a Tasty Low-Carb White (Béchamel) Sauce.

Béchamel, Alfredo, and other white pasta sauces usually start with a roux of butter and flour, so they tend to a) have gluten; and b) be a bit carby. This low-carb, gluten-free version isn’t paleo unless you include grass-fed, organic dairy as part of your paleo repertoire, but it’s really, really tasty either as a sauce by itself on one of your pasta substitutes, or combined with other meats and veggies, like chicken and broccoli or ham, spinach, and mushroom.

  • 1/4 cup grass-fed unsalted butter
  • 8 ounces grass-fed cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup grass-fed heavy cream
  • 1 cup grated grass-fed parmesan or asiago cheese
  1. In a medium pot, combine all the ingredients.
  2. Cook on medium-low, stirring constantly, until all the components are melted, and the sauce is well combined and smooth.

Pasta on, my Friends!

These are a few of my favorite ways to keep pasta-like dishes in my life. Combine your creativity with these tricks, and you won’t miss pasta a bit.

 

Low-Carb Pumpkin Spice Old Fashioned

pumpkinby Karen Frazier

My hubby, Jim, loves a good old fashioned. And he loves pumpkin spice stuff. This is the time of the year he starts asking me to make my low-carb pumpkin bourbon cheesecake. So why not combine the two?

Before you can make a low-carb pumpkin spice old fashioned, you first need to make low-carb pumpkin butter. It’s quick and easy in the slow cooker.

Low-Carb Pumpkin Butter

  • 1 (14-15 ounce) can organic pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie filling)
  • 1/4 cup hard apple cider
  • 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon maple extract (optional)

In a small slow cooker, combine all ingredients. Cook on high for three hours – stirring every 30 minutes to an hour. Remove the lid and continue to cook on high, stirring occasionally, for an additional 30 minutes or until you achieve the desired consistency. Refrigerate in a tightly sealed container for up to one week, or freeze for up to one year.

Basic Low-Carb Old Fashioned

  • 1/2 packet stevia (or a few drops of liquid stevia)
  • 3 dashes bitters (we love using orange-flavored bitters for this)
  • 2 ounces bourbon
  • Splash of water
  • Ice
  1. In a short glass, combine the stevia and bitters, stirring to mix well.
  2. Add the bourbon, water, and ice. Stir gently.
  3. Garnish with an orange wedge (you can also muddle the orange with the bitters and stevia, if you wish).

Low-Carb Pumpkin Spice Old Fashioned

  • 1/2 packet stevia (or a few drops of liquid stevia)
  • 3 dashes bitters
  • 1 teaspoon low-carb pumpkin butter
  • 2 ounces bourbon
  • Splash of water
  • Ice
  • Freshly grated nutmeg (optional)
  1. In a short glass, muddle together the stevia, bitters, and pumpkin butter.
  2. Add the bourbon, water, and ice. Stir gently to combine.
  3. Garnish with a fresh grating of nutmeg.

photo credit: garlandcannon Pumpkin Person via photopin (license)

Southwestern Marinated Tri-Tip Salad

tri-tipby Karen Frazier

Looking for an easy grilled meal with big flavor payoff? This is what’s on the Frazier table tonight…it’s delicious, low-carb, paleo, healthy, and easy to make. It takes less than 30 minutes of active time.

For the steak:

  • 8 garlic cloves
  • 1 bunch green onions, roughly chopped
  • 1 jalapeno, seeds and ribs removed and roughly chopped
  • Juice of 3 limes
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 to 3 pounds tri tip steaks

For the salad:

  • 6 cups iceberg lettuce
  • 12 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 bunch green onions, sliced
  • 1 avocado, peeled and pitted
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 1/4 cup chopped, fresh cilantro
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon finely chopped jalapeno, seeds and ribs removed
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

For the steak:

  1. In a food processor, combine the garlic, green onions, jalapeño, lime juice, sea salt, cilantro, and olive oil. Process until it forms a paste. Set aside one tablespoon of the paste.
  2. Marinate the steaks in the cilantro mixture for two to four hours.
  3. Heat your grill to medium-high.
  4. Wipe away any excess marinade.
  5. Grill the steaks until medium-rare, five to seven minutes per side.
  6. Rest the steak for ten minutes. Then, slice it into slices against the grain. Toss the warm steak with the reserved marinade.

For the salad:

  1. In a large bowl, toss the lettuce, tomatoes, green onion.
  2. In a blender or food processor, combine the avocado, lime juice, garlic, cilantro, salt, jalapeño, and olive oil. Blend until smooth.
  3. Toss the dressing with the salad.
  4. Top with the sliced steak.

photo credit: Tri Tip Dinner via photopin (license)

Autoimmune Flares: Possible Triggers & Solutions

pain in the usby Karen Frazier

I’m certain I have mentioned it before, but I started eating low-carb paleo out of self-defense. I have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and celiac disease, both which are autoimmune diseases. Changing the way I eat has been incredibly helpful in managing autoimmune symptoms, but occasionally I have flare-ups. For example, this week, I am experiencing an autoimmune flare, and I know I’ve done it to myself.

What Does a Flare Feel Like?

Autoimmune flares may feel different for different people, depending on the type of autoimmune disease they have. In my case, an autoimmune flare includes some, all, or a combination of the following symptoms of varying intensity (ranging from mild to debilitating) depending on the severity of the flare.

  • Consistent pain – both systemic (throughout my body) and in specific locations (particularly for me my hips)
  • Headaches
  • Exhaustion
  • Stuffy nose
  • Stomach pain
  • Decreased energy
  • Decreased physical stamina
  • Brain fog
  • Swollen glands
  • Fever and chills
  • Lightheadedness
  • Muscle aches, pains, or stiffness

What Causes a Flare?

In general, there is one major cause behind a flare-up of autoimmune symptoms: inflammation.  That’s why an anti-inflammatory paleo diet is so effective in calming symptoms of autoimmune disease – because they help your body naturally decrease inflammation by eliminating substances that trigger it.

Possible Dietary Triggers

I can tell you exactly why I’m experiencing a flare this week. It’s because I consumed some foods and substances that trigger inflammation in my body.

You’ve probably seen me mention the 90/10 principle, that as long as you eat cleanly 90 percent of the time, your body will tolerate the other 10 percent of the time when you slip in an inflammatory substance. For me, however, I notice that I can’t do that entire 10 percent in a single sitting (or over the course of a few days). I have to space it way out. The more triggers I consume, the more likely a flare is. For example, I might be able to slip in a little dairy or have an alcoholic beverage here and there, as long as those things occur in isolation. However, if I do as I did this past week, and I don’t get enough sleep so I have some caffeine (in a base with artificial sweetener), then have a few drinks at a wedding along with a few puffs of a friend’s cigar, spend a late night out dancing, come home and only sleep a few hours before getting up and moving again, try to continue my regular exercise routine, and have some dairy, chances are I’m going to be in trouble.

So what are the possible dietary triggers for autoimmune flares?

  • Dairy products
  • Caffeine
  • Artificial sweeteners
  • Sugar alcohols
  • Grains
  • Industrial seed oils (canola, sunflower, safflower, etc.)
  • Conventionally raised meats
  • Non-organic vegetables
  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Chemical additives like preservatives, colorings, etc.
  • Sugar
  • Nicotine
  • Gums and thickeners
  • Gluten
  • Too many omega-6 fatty acids

Other Potential Causes of Inflammation

Other things might cause inflammatory flare-ups, as well, including:

  • Lack of sleep
  • Stress
  • Overexertion/overexercising
  • Injury
  • Hormonal shifts

Solutions

Look, we all overindulge occasionally. What my body considers going on a debauched bender is very different than how it looks for other people, however. With my body’s tolerances, it’s a huge bender when I’ve had a few drinks, perhaps some artificial sweetener, and a touch of dairy while staying up past midnight one night. For me, that’s all it takes. It’s up to you to learn your body’s tolerances.

While it doesn’t seem fair that when people with autoimmune disease overindulge, they may experience a flare-up of pain and inflammation, the fact remains it happens. Therefore, your best bet is to take care to nature  your body to return to health as quickly as possible.

Return to Clean Eating

While you don’t have to return to a strict elimination diet, you will want to return to your way of clean eating, leaving out any small indulgences that may cause inflammation for the time-being. The time-frame you need to do this varies – for me it takes a week or two, although I start to feel better after a few days. If you haven’t done an elimination diet yet to determine what your food triggers are, I strongly recommend it.

Drink Plenty of Water

Water can help you flush out all of the stuff your body doesn’t like more quickly, so keep drinking lots of water as you work to decrease your body’s inflammatory response.

Sleep

When your body is inflamed, it needs rest. I get pretty tired when I experience a flare-up of inflammation, and I take the time to nurture my body’s needs by going to bed earlier and getting up later. I even indulge in a nap from time to time when this happens – I listen to my body’s sleep needs and do my very best to meet them.

Choose Gentle Physical Activity

Now is not the time to tell yourself pain is just weakness leaving the body. Your pain is telling you something, and it’s encouraging you to be gentle with yourself. Listen to your body as you exercise, and engage in gentle exercises like taking short walks or doing yoga. When you do exercise, pay attention to your body’s signals and adapt the exercise accordingly. During very severe flares, I have to skip exercise altogether for a few days. This week, I’ve been doing my regular Nia classes, but I’ve been adapting them to a less strenuous level. I’ve also skipped running altogether because my body just can’t tolerate it right now. Your body will tell you as you exercise whether it can handle more, or if you need to tone it down. Listen and respond accordingly.

Try Anti-Inflammatory Foods and Substances

There are foods and supplements that can help decrease inflammation and re-balance your body. These include the following:

  • Turmeric (I take supplements)
  • Omega-3 fatty acids (found in seafood, fish, flaxseed, and chia seeds)
  • Tomatoes
  • Leafy greens
  • Berries
  • Cherries
  • Ginger
  • Cloves
  • Green tea
  • Fermented foods

Heal Your Gut

If your 10 percent crept back up to being a majority of the way you ate over a sustained period, you may also want to work on healing your gut and encouraging healthy bacterial formation. Licorice (I use DGL) or marshmallow (the root, not the candy) can help to soothe the gut while probiotics and fermented foods can help re-colonize it in a healthier way.

Bust Stress

Stress contributes to inflammatory responses, so soothing your stress is essential. Along with getting adequate rest and sleep, choose activities that can help relieve stress, such as deep breathing exercises, yoga or tai chi, mindfulness, and meditation.

The Road to Health

Autoimmune flares can be frustrating, especially when you’ve been doing well. In my case, I’m almost always the cause of my flare, typically because I get in the mindset that a little bit of something isn’t going to hurt me. Then I have a little of this and a little of that until BAM – inflammation.

Different people have different tolerances to activities and substances that cause inflammation – and it can vary from time to time depending on other health factors, as well. That’s why it’s so important when you have autoimmune disease to tune into your body and listen to the signals it gives you. Then, it’s important to react quickly to those signals to honor your body’s needs in order to remain as vital and healthy as you possibly can.

 

Clam Chowder (Paleo-Style)

clam chowderby Karen Frazier

Clam chowder….what can I say? It’s a family favorite, but with my Celiac disease and dairy allergy, I’ve had to make it over in a way that works for my diet. This version is made with anti-inflammatory ingredients, and it’s lowish in carbs and paleo, so it’s perfect for people with all sorts of inflammatory autoimmune conditions, like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

  • 6 slices pepper bacon, cut into pieces
  • 1 fennel bulb, chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 8 cups bone broth
  • 2 (6-ounce) cans clams, undrained
  • 1 celery root (celeriac), peeled and cut into half-inch cubes
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried tarragon
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • Pinch red pepper flakes (or to taste – I like mine a bit on the spicy side)
  • 3 tablespoons arrowroot powder
  • 3 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fennel fronds
  1. In a large pot, cook the pepper bacon on medium-high until it is browned. Remove the bacon from the fat in the pot with a slotted spoon and set it aside.
  2. To the fat in the pan, add the fennel, celery, onion, and carrot. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables begin to brown, five to seven minutes.
  3. Add the bone broth, scraping any browned bits from the bottom of the pan with the side of a spoon.
  4. Add the clams, celery root, thyme, tarragon, pepper, salt, and pepper flakes. Bring to a simmer. Reduce to medium-low and cook until the celery root is tender, about 10 minutes.
  5. In a small bowl, whisk together the arrowroot powder and water. Pour it into the soup in a thin stream, stirring constantly. Simmer, stirring, until the chowder thickens slightly, about three minutes more.
  6. Stir in the reserve bacon and the fennel fronds.

photo credit: Pike Place Chowder via photopin (license)

Peanut Butter Fudge Pie

pieby Karen Frazier

If you’re on a low-carb or gluten-free diet, you can still enjoy sweets from time to time. This peanut butter fudge pie is easy to make, low in carbs, and it has a chocolatey nut crust, so it’s gluten-free and dairy-free, as well. To make it paleo (but not low-carb), you can replace the sweetener in the crust and the filling with pure maple syrup or honey to taste. I don’t like things to be super sweet, so I recommend doing the add a little sweetener and taste until you get to your desired level of sweetness, or the pie might not be sweet enough for you as written.

  • 1  1/2 cups pecans
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 3/4 cup granulated Truvia (in the green plastic jar) or Swerve sweetener
  • 1/4 cup melted coconut oil
  • 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 3 (14-ounce) cans coconut milk (full-fat), refrigerated overnight until the liquid separates from the cream (discard the liquid), or 2 cups coconut cream, divided
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract, divided
  • 15 to 20 drops of liquid stevia or liquid sucralose (or to taste – you may want more)
  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Grease a pie plate with coconut oil.
  3. In a food processor, pulse the pecans, cocoa powder, and Truvia or Swerve until well chopped, about 15 one-second pulses.
  4. Add the melted coconut oil and continue processing for 30 seconds.
  5. Press into the prepared pie plate. Bake the crust in the oven until browned and fragrant, 15 to 20 minutes. Allow to cool on a wire rack.
  6. In a small saucepan (or in the microwave), melt the chocolate and peanut butter, stirring to combine.
  7. In a large bowl, combine two of the cans of the coconut cream (just the thick part with the water poured off – about one and a half cups) with one teaspoon of the vanilla and the liquid stevia or sucralose.
  8. Add the melted chocolate and peanut butter. Beat until well combined.
  9. Pour into the cooled crust. Refrigerate until the filling hardens.
  10. In a medium bowl, combine the remaining one can of coconut cream (or a half cup of the cream without the liquid), the remaining teaspoon of vanilla, and stevia or sucralose drops to taste. Beat with an electric beater on high until fluffy, three to four minutes. Spread on the chilled pie. Return to the refrigerator until you are ready to serve.

photo credit: “Squared” Coconut Pie via photopin (license)