Kalbi Beef Ribs

galbi-ribsby Karen Frazier

Kalbi marinade is a Korean marinade that has lots of flavor and seems to have a true affinity for beef. I marinate flanken-style beef ribs, but you can use it on slices of beef or pork, as well.

  • 1 Asian pear, peeled, cored, and roughly chopped
  • 6 garlic cloves
  • 4 green onions, roots removed and roughly chopped
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/4 cup gluten-free soy sauce or coconut aminos
  • 1 packet of stevia (omit for Whole30)
  • 2 tablespoons gochujang¬†(omit for Paleo or Whole30 and instead use 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes)
  • 1 tablespoon grated gingerroot
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 3 pounds flanken-style spare ribs
  • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds
  1. In a food processor, combine the pear, garlic, green onion, sesame oil, soy sauce or coconut aminos, stevia, gochujang or red pepper flakes, olive oil, and ginger. Process on high until smooth.
  2. Marinate the ribs in the marinade for eight to ten hours.
  3. Grill. I just pop them on the Foreman and grill them for about five minutes. Garnish with sesame seeds and thinly sliced green onions.

photo credit: moonlightbulb Galbi at Asahi via photopin (license)

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Beef Bulgogi and Sweet Potato Bowls

beef-bowlby Karen Frazier

I’ve been on a bit of an Asian flavor kick lately – so this recipe probably won’t surprise you. ūüôā These bowls are nothing but goodness with lovely spiced beef, starchy sweet potatoes, and lots of garnishes.

  • 6¬†garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons grated ginger root
  • 1/4 cup chopped, fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 cup coconut aminos
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/2 cup rice vinegar or coconut vinegar
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2¬†packet stevia or 4¬†tablespoons honey, divided*
  • 1 pound flank steak, hanger steak, or flat-iron steak, cut into 1/2 inch thick strips against the grain
  • 1 cucumber,¬†julienned
  • 4¬†tablespoons coconut oil, divided
  • 2 sweet potatoes, cubed
  • 1 carrot, julienned
  • 1/4 cup bean sprouts
  • 3 green onions, thinly sliced on the bias
  • 2 eggs
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  1. In a food processor, combine the garlic, ginger root, cilantro, coconut aminos, sesame oil, 1/2 cup of the vinegar, olive oil, red pepper flakes, and 1 packet of the stevia or 2 tablespoons of the honey. Process until pureed.
  2. Place the strips of steak in a gallon sized plastic zipper bag and add the marinade. Seal and refrigerate for eight hours.
  3. In a small bowl, combine the remaining 1/4 cup of vinegar with 1/2 teaspoon of sea salt and 1 packet of stevia or two tablespoons of honey. Add the cucumber. Refrigerate for a few hours.
  4. In a large skillet, heat two tablespoons of the coconut oil on medium-high. Add the sweet potatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned, about ten minutes. Set aside tented with foil.
  5. In the same skillet, heat the remaining two tablespoons of coconut oil on medium-high. Remove the beef from the marinade and pat dry with a paper towel. Cook the beef in the hot oil until cooked through, about five minutes.
  6. In a small nonstick skillet, fry two eggs, sunny side up or easy over. Season with salt and pepper.
  7. To assemble the bowls, divide the sweet potatoes into two bowls. Top with the beef, the carrots, the pickled cucumber, the been sprouts, and the green onions. Top with the fried egg.

*For Whole30, omit the honey and stevia and instead add 1 chopped medjool date to the marinade and omit any sweetener from the cucumber pickle.

photo credit: Dolsot bibimbap @ L’Arbre de Sel @ Montparnasse @ Paris via photopin (license)

Spicy Ginger Cucumber Salad with Crispy Pork Belly

3246364802_4c7c793966by Karen Frazier

I have to admit – I am not a huge fan of cucumbers except in certain circumstances. I won’t just sit down and eat cucumber – but I do like it as an acidic and refreshing counterpoint to something super spicy. So the other day, I picked up some organic cucumbers at the grocery store with the thought I’d do a refreshing and spicy dish of some kind. This is what I threw together today (I failed to take a photo of it – sorry), and it was super delicious. ¬†I just put crispy slices of the pork belly right on top of the salad.

It’s low-carb, paleo, and can be Whole30 compliant, as well.

Crispy Pork Belly

  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • Pinch cayenne
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 pound pork belly, thinly sliced like thick sliced bacon
  1. In a small bowl, combine the salt, pepper, cayenne, garlic powder, and onion powder.
  2. Preheat a skillet on medium-high.
  3. Season the pork belly slices with the seasoning blend. Put in the hot skillet. Cook just like you would bacon, until crispy. Slice and put on top of the salad (below).

Spicy Ginger Cucumber Salad

  • 4¬†organic cucumbers, spiralized into angel hair noodles (or just julienne them)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt, divided
  • 1 cup julienned radish
  • 6 scallions, thinly sliced on the bias
  • 3 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger root
  • 1 to 2 thai chilies, minced (or 1 tablespoon chili garlic sauce)
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon Chinese hot mustard powder
  • 1 teaspoon expeller pressed sesame oil
  • 1 packet stevia (optional – omit for Whole30 or add 1/2 finely chopped Medjool date for a bit of sweetness)
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup EVOO
  1. Put the cucumbers in a colander over a bowl and sprinkle them with 1 teaspoon of the sea salt. Allow the water to drain for 30 minutes. Rinse the cucumbers and pat them dry with a paper towel. Put them in a large bowl.
  2. Add the radish, scallions, and sesame seeds and toss to combine.
  3. In a blender or food processor, combine the ginger root, thai chilies, garlic, Chinese hot mustard powder, sesame oil, stevia, apple cider vinegar, EVOO, and the remaining half teaspoon of sea salt. Blend on high until emulsified. Toss with the salad.

photo credit: Vilseskogen harvest via photopin (license)

Paleo (and Whole30) Chicken Pad Thai with Thai “Peanut” Sauce

img_2661by Karen Frazier

Oh man do I love pad Thai, and it’s something I’ve missed eating in the few years since I went completely paleo. I decided – after 2 1/2 years – to make my own. It’s a bit labor intensive, but if you love pad Thai like I do, it’s well worth the effort. I made my tamarind paste from pods, but if you can find some with paleo/Whole30-approved ingredients, feel free to use that, instead.

Tamarind Paste

  • 10 tamarind pods
  • Boiling water
  1. Peel away all the tough outer shell of the pods, and use a sharp paring knife to remove any of the woody spines and discard them.
  2. Place the tamarind in a heat proof glass measuring cup and just cover them with boiling water. Allow the pods to soak in the hot water for 45 minutes.
  3. Reserve 3 tablespoons of the soaking water and set aside. Discard the rest of the water.
  4. Put the tamarind in a bowl and mash with a potato masher. Remove any solids (seeds or more spines) and discard them.
  5. Place a wire mesh sieve over a bowl. Spoon the tamarind into the sieve. Using the back of a wooden spoon, press the tamarind through the sieve. Do this for about five minutes, using a rubber scraper to scrape the paste from the bottom side of the sieve into the bowl every minute or two. You should wind up with about 1/4 cup of the paste. The goal is to get as much of the paste as possible away from the seeds and pulp.
  6. Stir in the reserved liquid.

Thai “Peanut” Sauce

  • 1 1/2 cups organic sugar-free almond butter
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • Juice of three limes
  • 1 tablespoon minced ginger root
  • 1 thai chili, finely minced (optional)
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 3 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1 tablespoon Red Boat fish sauce

In a food processor, combine all ingredients. Blend until smooth.

Pad Thai

  • 3 tablespoons Red boat fish sauce
  • 3 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper, divided
  • 8¬†garlic cloves, minced, divided
  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into thin strips
  • 4 tablespoons coconut oil, divided
  • 2 shallots, thinly sliced and broken up into rings
  • 1 large carrot, julienned (or grated)
  • 1 red bell pepper, julienned
  • 6 green onions, thinly sliced, divided
  • 1/4 cup tamarind paste
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 to 2 thai chilies, finely minced (or to taste)
  • 4 to 6 zucchini, spiralized into spaghetti style noodles (enough for¬†about five cups)
  • 1/4 cup bean sprouts
  • 1 lime, quartered
  • 1/4 cup chopped cashews
  • 1/4 cup chopped, fresh cilantro
  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the fish sauce, coconut aminos, 1/8 teaspoon of the pepper, and 4 of the garlic cloves. Add the chicken. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour and up to 8 hours.
  2. In a large skillet or wok, heat two tablespoons of the coconut oil on medium high. Remove the chicken from the marinade and cook, stirring occasionally, until cooked through, five to seven minutes. Remove the chicken from the pan and set aside.
  3. In the same pan, heat the remaining two tablespoons of coconut oil on medium-high. Add the shallots, carrots, red bell peppers, thai chilies, and half of the green onions. Cook, stirring, for one minute.
  4. Add the zucchini noodles and cook, stirring, for three to four minutes more, until the vegetables are crisp tender. Add the remaining 4 garlic cloves and cook, stirring constantly, for 30 seconds.
  5. Add the tamarind paste, water, and the remaining 1/8 teaspoon of pepper. Return the chicken to the pan. Cook, stirring, until the noodles are coated with sauce and water evaporates, about two minutes more.
  6. Serve garnished with bean sprouts, the remaining green onions, the cashews, the cilantro, and the lime wedges. Spoon peanut sauce over the top.

Paleo Ph’o

by Karen Frazier

img_2633The first time I tried ph’o, I knew I’d found something special. It’s possibly my favorite soup of all time (ha! I say that about a lot of soups. I just. Love. Soup!). Anyway – it’s been almost three years without it, and I knew it was time to give it a try. I had some flat iron steaks, and I realized ph’o would be the perfect use of the steak. Jim, who pretty much believes meat should be used as – well, meat – was skeptical. However, I’m happy to say he’s a convert.

The recipe uses fish sauce – and Red Boat fish sauce is both Whole30 approved and paleo. The recipe serves 4 to 6.

Paleo, Whole30 Ph’o

  • Grass-fed beef bones
  • 1 or two onions, roughly chopped
  • 2 garlic bulbs, split lengthwise (tops cut off, but use both the top and the bottom)
  • 3-inch knob of ginger, sliced
  • 1 carrot, roughly chopped
  • 2 or 3 thai chilies, split lengthwise (it’s up to you – they’re pretty spicy and they add a good bit of heat for how tiny they are. You can remove the seeds to minimize the heat a bit or leave them out altogether)
  • 6 star anise pods (or about a teaspoon of Chinese 5 spice – or to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons Red Boat fish sauce (or to taste)
  • 12 peppercorns
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt (or to taste)
  • 1 to 2 pounds sirloin steak or flat-iron steak, very thinly sliced against the grain
  • 4 to 6¬†zucchini, spiralized into noodles using the angel hair blade
  • 1 bunch cilantro, chopped (or Thai basil)
  • Finely chopped thai chilies
  • Green onions, thinly sliced
  • Lime wedges
  • Bean sprouts
  1. In an 8-quart slow cooker, cover the beef bones, halved onion, garlic bulbs, ginger, thai chiles, and star anise pods with cold water. Add the fish sauce, peppercorns, and salt. Cover and cook on low for 12 to 24 hours. Strain into a large pot and discard the solids. Taste and add fish sauce, salt, or Chinese 5 spice as desired to adjust the flavor to your taste.
  2. Bring the broth to a boil. Add the beef and cook for one minute. Add the noodles and cook one minute more.
  3. Serve garnished with cilantro, chopped thai chilies, sliced green onions, lime wedges, and bean sprouts.

Next time, I’m adding sauteed shiitakes. Just because.

For faster ph’o, you can simmer your beef bone broth on the stovetop for about four hours.

Lebanese Garlic Chicken Thighs and Warm Spinach Salad

img_2619by Karen Frazier

I’m on day 22 of my Whole30 30-day challenge, and I’ve been¬†tinkering in the kitchen. Yesterday, I decided to make Lebanese garlic sauce. Today, I decided to spread it on chicken thighs. The result? Delicious!

The recipe is Whole30 approved when you use sugar-free bacon (I like it from US Wellness Meats), as well as paleo and low-carb.

Lebanese Garlic Sauce

Makes about 2 1/2 cups

  • 1/2 cup peeled garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 cups EVOO
  • Juice of 3 lemons
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  1. In a food processor or blender, combine the garlic cloves and sea salt. Blend, scraping down the sides occasionally, until the garlic cloves make a fine paste.
  2. Add the EVOO in a very thin stream with the food processor still running until it is completely incorporated. This step will take about 10 minutes.
  3. Add the lemon juice and pepper. Blend briefly to mix.

This has pretty good kick, but you can taste and adjust by adding more olive oil or lemon juice to suit your own taste buds, which is what I do. Even after I’ve added the lemon juice, I add extra olive oil, just making sure it goes in a thin stream. This will store in your fridge, tightly sealed, for a few weeks. If you prefer a more neutrally flavored oil, you can use another expeller pressed oil, such as avocado oil, or use half avocado oil and half EVOO. I like the California Olive Ranch everyday EVOO, which has a mild flavor.

Lebanese Garlic Chicken Thighs

Serves 4

  • 8 whole chicken thighs
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 tablespoons Lebanese garlic sauce
  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Place the chicken thighs, skin side up, in a large baking or roasting pan and sprinkle them with the sea salt and black pepper.
  3. Spread each with one tablespoon (or more) of the Lebanese garlic sauce.
  4. Bake in the preheated oven for 70 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through.

I like to make enough for two meals – my motto is cook once and eat twice. It’s a great time saver.

Warm Spinach Salad

Serves 4

  • 6 slices sugar-free bacon, chopped
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar, red wine vinegar, or champagne vinegar
  • 10 ounces baby spinach
  1. In a medium saute pan on medium-high heat, brown the bacon until all the fat is rendered. Remove the bacon from the fat in the pan with a slotted spoon and set it aside.
  2. Add the shallot to the fat in the pan along with the salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, for one minute.
  3. Add the orange juice and vinegar. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the liquid is reduced by half, three or four minutes.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the spinach and the bacon. Toss with the warm vinaigrette and serve immediately.

 

Crispy Pork Belly and Shiitake Mushrooms on Asian Slaw

IMG_2559.JPGby Karen Frazier

For the new year, I’ve embarked on a Whole30 30-day re-set through my Nia/yoga studio. Although I tend to eat fairly cleanly or suffer the consequences, my habits towards the end of the year slipped a bit, so a Whole30 clean eating re-set is the perfect way to banish some inflammation I know built up over the holidays. For today’s recipe, I use pork belly that I get from Tenderbelly. It’s as delicious as it sounds.

Crispy Pork Belly and Shiitake Mushrooms on Asian Slaw

For the pork and mushrooms

  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4¬†teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4¬†teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/4¬†teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound pork belly, thinly sliced (about like thick cut bacon-width) and then cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 2 tablespoons duck fat (or lard or another Whole30 friendly fat)
  • 8 ounces shiitake mushrooms, quartered

For the slaw

  • 6¬†cups of shredded cabbage
  • 2 carrots, peeled and grated
  • 1 bunch green onions, sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated ginger
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons¬†raw apple cider vinegar
  • Juice of one orange
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds

For the pork belly:

  1. In a small bowl, mix the sea salt, garlic powder, onion powder, smoked paprika, and black pepper. Sprinkle the mixture evenly over the pork belly.
  2. In a large skillet (I use a 12-inch cast iron skillet), heat the duck fat on medium-high until it shimmers.
  3. Add the pork belly and mushrooms. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the pork belly is crisp, about eight minutes.

For the slaw:

  1. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, carrots, and green onions.
  2. In a small glass measuring cup, whisk together the garlic, ginger, cilantro, sea salt, pepper, apple cider vinegar, orange, and olive oil until combined. Toss with the slaw.
  3. To assemble, spoon the dressed slaw onto a plate or into a bowl. Top with the shiitake and pork belly. Garnish with sesame seeds and sliced green onions, if desired.

Southwestern Marinated Tri-Tip Salad

tri-tipby Karen Frazier

Looking for an easy grilled meal with big flavor payoff? This is what’s on the Frazier table tonight…it’s delicious, low-carb, paleo, healthy, and easy to make. It takes less than 30 minutes of active time.

For the steak:

  • 8 garlic cloves
  • 1 bunch green onions, roughly chopped
  • 1 jalapeno, seeds and ribs removed and roughly chopped
  • Juice of 3 limes
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 to 3 pounds tri tip steaks

For the salad:

  • 6 cups iceberg lettuce
  • 12 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 bunch green onions, sliced
  • 1 avocado,¬†peeled and pitted
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 1/4 cup chopped, fresh cilantro
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon finely chopped jalapeno, seeds and ribs removed
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

For the steak:

  1. In a food processor, combine the garlic, green onions, jalape√Īo, lime juice, sea salt, cilantro, and olive oil. Process until it forms a paste. Set aside one tablespoon of the paste.
  2. Marinate the steaks in the cilantro mixture for two to four hours.
  3. Heat your grill to medium-high.
  4. Wipe away any excess marinade.
  5. Grill the steaks until medium-rare, five to seven minutes per side.
  6. Rest the steak for ten minutes. Then, slice it into slices against the grain. Toss the warm steak with the reserved marinade.

For the salad:

  1. In a large bowl, toss the lettuce, tomatoes, green onion.
  2. In a blender or food processor, combine the avocado, lime juice, garlic, cilantro, salt, jalape√Īo, and olive oil. Blend until smooth.
  3. Toss the dressing with the salad.
  4. Top with the sliced steak.

photo credit: Tri Tip Dinner via photopin (license)

Drunken Steak

drunken steakby Karen Frazier

If you have steak that’s looking for a good time, then drunken steak is for you. It’s a really delicious way to prepare skirt steak or tri-tip.

  • 1/4 cup bourbon
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 6 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 2 tablespoons sriracha
  • 1 skirt steak
  1. Whisk together the bourbon, soy sauce, garlic, and sriracha.
  2. In a shallow bowl or a zipper bag, marinate the steak in the above mixture for eight hours.
  3. Grill on high heat for three to five minutes per side.
  4. Cut the steak against the grain into thin strips.